Dance Video Game Training and Falling in Parkinson’s Disease

This study compares the use of a commercially available dance pad video game, Dance Dance Revolution, to two traditional treatment options that help people with Parkinson’s Disease reduce their risk of falling by increasing their balance, strength, endurance, motor coordination, and visual-motor integration.  The two traditional treatments are rhythmic stepping with music and treadmill training with music.  To evaluate the game in comparison to the two traditional treatments, the researchers assess balance, motor function, reaction time, and self-confidence, and they use functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to observe participants’ brain activity.

 

Principal Investigator
Photo
Director
ADAM (Analysis of Dance and Movement) Center
Co-Investigator
Adam Noah, Ph.D.
Technical Director
ADAM (Analysis of Dance and Movement) Center

News

Grantee Project Publication Title Datesort icon
Long Island University
Dance Video Game Training and Falling in Parkinson’s Disease Press Release ADAM Center of Long Island University’s Brooklyn Campus Studies How Video Games Can Improve Health
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01/07/2010

Presentations

Williams-Murray Z., Ali S., Noah J.A., & Bronner S. (2010). Cognitive processing effects of dance video game training in healthy adults. In proceedings from the Meaningful Play Conference, East Lansing, MI.

Bronner, S. & Noah, A. (2010). Falling risk in Parkinson’s disease and dance video game training. Poster Presentation to the Neurology Section, American Physical Therapy Association Combined Sections Meeting (APTA), San Diego, CA. 

Bronner, S., Noah, A., & Tachibana, A. (2010). Bi-modal and uni-modal information processing in a complex stepping task. Presented at the Society for Neuroscience Conference, San Diego, CA.

Bronner, S., Noah, A., & Tachibana, A. (2010, February). Sensory-motor processing in a complex stepping task with and without music using fMRI. Presented at the Combined Sections Meeting, APTA, New Orleans, LA. 

Bronner, S., Noah, A., & Tachibana, A. (2010, Octboer). Implementing neuroplasticity principled training paradigms with rhythmic exer-games for all ages and disease processes. Presented at the Meaningful Play Conference, E. Lansing, MI. 

Bronner, S., Noah, A., & Tachibana, A. (2011, February). Supraspinal neural networks in internal versus external triggered stepping. Presented at the Combined Sections Meeting, APTA, New Orleans, LA. 

Bronner, S., Noah, J.A. (2010). Gaming, exer-games and behavior, cognition, and neuro-plasticity. Dance Dance Revolution, Guitar Hero, Wii Fit. Presented at the Spring Meeting of the Medical & Scientific Libraries of Long Island (MEDLI), Long Island, NY.

Noah, A., Tachibana, A., & Bronner S. (2010, October). Neural feed-forward and feedback mechanisms of meaningful game play. Presented at the Meaningful Play Conference, E. Lansing, MI.

 

Noah, J., Tachibana, A., & Bronner, S. (2010). FMRI studies & using games for Parkinson’s. Presented at the ePatient Conference, Philadelphia, PA.

Noah, J., Tachibana, A., & Bronner, S. (2010). Neural activity in internally versus externally triggered stepping in an fMRI block design. Presented at the Society for Neuroscience Conference, San Diego, CA.